Morrissey Central (& SER YT): "DAVEY THE WIND BLOWS BITS OF YOUR LIFE AWAY" (July 2, 2020)

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"We hadn’t rehearsed the song. David called me at my hotel and we tried to duet down the phone, which became very funny because David couldn’t remember the words, but on the night it was me who forgot and David remembered. You can see a slight disapproval from him when I repeat and repeat the wrong lines … his look says ‘you shouldn’t be singing that bit again’. This clip is my 4th favorite memory of David. It’s nice that Ron and Russell are in there too, but Russell looks irked … I expect he was missing the concluding sequel of that night’s Columbo.”
Morrissey 30 June 2020"

Regards,
FWD.
 
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gordyboy9

its not me its you.
I want to know about the other 3 most memorable memories of David. Right now! Morrissey looks so like "A man trapped in a man's body" while David simply passes by like a fantastic bird from outta space (Hello spaceboy). Debbie D.: I love her. God, I can't stop watching this again and again.
1.laughing gnome.
2.b side to laughng gnome.
3.M sticking his pinky through the hole on the 7 inch single of laughing gnome.
heard this from a very good source so dont be spreading it about.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I thought it was "what's it like to be a loon" but have seen both on lyrics pages. On the "Bolan World" page it's "loon".

On the original vinyl sleeve it's Loon
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Was this at the Forum? My first time seeing Morrissey, I was to the left of the stage, in the rafters. We couldn't tell he was there until he started singing then people started crying and freaking out. You can hear it. Electric.
 

joe frady

Vile Refusenik
A flyer for the night 13 year old Morrissey first saw Bowie, at The Hardrock's opening night, just round the corner from his Stretford home {Steven's, not David's} ~

Bowie hard rock ticket september 1972.jpg

"T. Rex are my first concert and my dad and sister drop me off at daunting Belle Vue on June 16th 1972, watching me waddle away alone in my purple satin jacket – a sight ripe for psychiatric scrutiny. I am now determined, and newly emerged from Groovin’ with Mr Bloe by Mr Bloe. England was already set to change trains from Marc Bolan to David Bowie, whose Starman single had shaken everyone with its somewhere-over-the-rainbow chorus and Blue Mink’s Melting pot bridge.

Full-page advertising for David Bowie’s new Top Rank tour causes me to laugh excitedly as I see the now famous shot of spike-thin Bowie half-propped on a high stool, wearing tight white satin pants tucked into plastic boxer-boots, one hand on hip, the other hand pointing the way to somewhere, quite fanatically homosexual.

The face is damned-soul-as-savior-of-society, preacher and reformer, now free of his own unhappy childhood and willing to help you through yours should Black Sabbath and Deep Purple prove insufficient.

I crawl from the cultureless world to Stretford Hardrock in September 1972, where David Bowie is showcasing the venue. At mid-day he emerges from a black Mercedes, every inch the eighth dimension, teetering on high heels, with all the wisdom of our ancestors. Smiling keenly, he accepts the note of a dull schoolboy whose overblown soul is more ablaze than the school blazer he wears, and thus I touch the hand of this inexplicably liberating reformer; he, a Wildean visionary about to re-mold England, and I, a spectacle of suffering in a blue school uniform.*"

* Why is he wearing his school uniform on a Saturday?

.
 

CrystalGeezer

My secret's my enzyme.
Adam Leming in a brand new white Nissan Sentra.
 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
A flyer for the night 13 year old Morrissey first saw Bowie, at The Hardrock's opening night, just round the corner from his Stretford home {Steven's, not David's} ~


"T. Rex are my first concert and my dad and sister drop me off at daunting Belle Vue on June 16th 1972, watching me waddle away alone in my purple satin jacket – a sight ripe for psychiatric scrutiny. I am now determined, and newly emerged from Groovin’ with Mr Bloe by Mr Bloe. England was already set to change trains from Marc Bolan to David Bowie, whose Starman single had shaken everyone with its somewhere-over-the-rainbow chorus and Blue Mink’s Melting pot bridge.

Full-page advertising for David Bowie’s new Top Rank tour causes me to laugh excitedly as I see the now famous shot of spike-thin Bowie half-propped on a high stool, wearing tight white satin pants tucked into plastic boxer-boots, one hand on hip, the other hand pointing the way to somewhere, quite fanatically homosexual.

The face is damned-soul-as-savior-of-society, preacher and reformer, now free of his own unhappy childhood and willing to help you through yours should Black Sabbath and Deep Purple prove insufficient.

I crawl from the cultureless world to Stretford Hardrock in September 1972, where David Bowie is showcasing the venue. At mid-day he emerges from a black Mercedes, every inch the eighth dimension, teetering on high heels, with all the wisdom of our ancestors. Smiling keenly, he accepts the note of a dull schoolboy whose overblown soul is more ablaze than the school blazer he wears, and thus I touch the hand of this inexplicably liberating reformer; he, a Wildean visionary about to re-mold England, and I, a spectacle of suffering in a blue school uniform.*"

* Why is he wearing his school uniform on a Saturday?

.

School sports? A mass the school had to attend?
 

gordyboy9

its not me its you.
£1,cant get much cheaper than that.
according to a what price then and now calculator £1 in 1972 with inflation is £14.27 now so how come tickets are £70 and more.rip off britain.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
A flyer for the night 13 year old Morrissey first saw Bowie, at The Hardrock's opening night, just round the corner from his Stretford home {Steven's, not David's} ~


"T. Rex are my first concert and my dad and sister drop me off at daunting Belle Vue on June 16th 1972, watching me waddle away alone in my purple satin jacket – a sight ripe for psychiatric scrutiny. I am now determined, and newly emerged from Groovin’ with Mr Bloe by Mr Bloe. England was already set to change trains from Marc Bolan to David Bowie, whose Starman single had shaken everyone with its somewhere-over-the-rainbow chorus and Blue Mink’s Melting pot bridge.

Full-page advertising for David Bowie’s new Top Rank tour causes me to laugh excitedly as I see the now famous shot of spike-thin Bowie half-propped on a high stool, wearing tight white satin pants tucked into plastic boxer-boots, one hand on hip, the other hand pointing the way to somewhere, quite fanatically homosexual.

The face is damned-soul-as-savior-of-society, preacher and reformer, now free of his own unhappy childhood and willing to help you through yours should Black Sabbath and Deep Purple prove insufficient.

I crawl from the cultureless world to Stretford Hardrock in September 1972, where David Bowie is showcasing the venue. At mid-day he emerges from a black Mercedes, every inch the eighth dimension, teetering on high heels, with all the wisdom of our ancestors. Smiling keenly, he accepts the note of a dull schoolboy whose overblown soul is more ablaze than the school blazer he wears, and thus I touch the hand of this inexplicably liberating reformer; he, a Wildean visionary about to re-mold England, and I, a spectacle of suffering in a blue school uniform.*"

* Why is he wearing his school uniform on a Saturday?

.
The uniform is his only clothes...remember he would have went out that night but he didn't have a stitch to wear.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
£1,cant get much cheaper than that.
according to a what price then and now calculator £1 in 1972 with inflation is £14.27 now so how come tickets are £70 and more.rip off britain.
Good question that. Dearest I've paid for Moz tickets was when he last played London Palladium in March 2018. I missed out on the general sale as every ticket agency seemed to sell out at one second past 9am on the day of release so I panicked and bought two tickets off Viagogo at 9:20am for a total of £260, first and only time I've used them and I did feel duped with all the add ons, extra fees etc However they did send the tickets recorded delivery to the hotel I was staying at in London the day before the gig and my partner & I went into the Palladium next evening for the first time ever. That gig has to be up there with the best gigs I've ever seen, everything was perfect and the way that Morrissey sang inches from the front row was magnificent, a throwback to days when the fans worshipped at the feet of their hero with no barriers, gap or heavy handed security, it was wonderful to see.
That was the last night of the tour and it was an absolute privilege to see Morrissey in such a great venue and may I add WORTH EVERY PENNY!!!
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
£1,cant get much cheaper than that.
according to a what price then and now calculator £1 in 1972 with inflation is £14.27 now so how come tickets are £70 and more.rip off britain.
I suspect we might be at a tipping point now; prices are either going to drop like a stone or sky rocket again. Personally, I believe they will sky rocket again. Artists and venues will be concocting the excuses as we speak.
 
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Nerak

Reverse Ferret
I suspect we might be at a tipping point now; prices are either going to drop like a stone or sky rocket again. Personally, I suspect they will sky rocket again. Artists and venues will be concocting the excuses as we speak.

Not yet. We're too busy pleading with the governments to give us more money.

Yesterday was awful, it was just one redundancy after another. I survived this round.
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
Tbf we have talked about putting prices up - but it would have to be insanely high.
There you go—it will get insanely high. Most will become priced out entirely. If the government has any sense it will relax the prohibitions on live music in pubs to save the concept of accessible live music and challenge the price hikes. I recognise, of course, that will be a sensitive issue.
 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><><><>
There you go—it will get insanely high. Most will become priced out entirely. If the government has any sense it will relax the prohibitions on live music in pubs to save the concept of accessible live music and challenge the price hikes. I recognise, of course, that will be a sensitive issue.


Ever since the pandemic, we can be sure there won’t be any more gobbing
allowed at live shows.


It’s a different world now :(
 

Nerak

Reverse Ferret
There you go—it will get insanely high. Most will become priced out entirely. If the government has any sense it will relax the prohibitions on live music in pubs to save the concept of accessible live music and challenge the price hikes. I recognise, of course, that will be a sensitive issue.

We'll know by September - all the the venues that can't survive will be gone by then & we'll be programming Spring.
 

Hovis Lesley

Well-Known Member
We'll know by September - all the the venues that can't survive will be gone by then & we'll be programming Spring.
I don’t think we’ll really know for about 3 years. Given that ENO is subsidised (as far as I know), I dare say more millionaires will be pleading poverty and asking for subsidies for their music projects.

As an aside, but a related one, I’ve noticed the price of recorded music—and physical formats in particular—is starting to climb exponentially.
 

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