The exclusive vinyl thread

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Listened to the two 7" Attack singles.
q7.jpg


This tiny record is like a scoop of ice cream for the ears. I really appreciated listening to "In the Future When All's Hell" individually, and not in the cohort of a full album side or a chain of streamable songs attached to it. I would even say that the song changes its meaning and its expressive powers when listened to individually. The B-side is "Christian Dior", a song I have never been able to relate to or even surrender myself to fully and nakedly, but after listening to it individually with a long stretch of silence before and after the tune, it felt as if the song had come alive while I was standing in the streets of Rome wondering where to go next. So what else can you do but play it again. Some 7" singles do not benefit from this special treatment. This one definitely does.

I don't listen to 7" singles often, they are something to look at and touch mostly, I think. Under your finger tips the jacket of Future feels like a high-quality fabric which will last a few decades if not more, it's cool and coarse at the same time.
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I could put my fingers on it for hours. It's delicate and elegant but also sturdy. Same material as the Swords album. Not sure what they call it.
Generally, I like the Attack records for their minimalist style but also high-quality appearance. Probably the influence of the Italian fashion industry during that time.

q11.jpg


These two singles look like a pair of ties, one in light blue for the boy, and one in light pink for the girl. Just the essentials. I prefer the cover of "Future" to that of "Redondo" though, just because of that reason, as the photograph on the Redondo cover represents a completely different style, it is American, and lacks the European understatement of the label. Why they chose a pink label though, I can't say.

q10.jpg


I thought, I could as well add some rustic style to the melange of styles of Redondo, and see what happens. The live version of "Light" is another treat. Both songs, Redondo and Light benefit from an individual listen, and seem to bloom under these exclusive circumstances, which makes us all happy in the long run, of course.
 
J

Janice

Guest
Listened to the two 7" Attack singles.
View attachment 69366

This tiny record is like a scoop of ice cream for the ears. I really appreciated listening to "In the Future When All's Hell" individually, and not in the cohort of a full album side or a chain of streamable songs attached to it. I would even say that the song changes its meaning and its expressive powers when listened to individually. The B-side is "Christian Dior", a song I have never been able to relate to or even surrender myself to fully and nakedly, but after listening to it individually with a long stretch of silence before and after the tune, it felt as if the song had come alive while I was standing in the streets of Rome wondering where to go next. So what else can you do but play it again. Some 7" singles do not benefit from this special treatment. This one definitely does.

I don't listen to 7" singles often, they are something to look at and touch mostly, I think. Under your finger tips the jacket of Future feels like a high-quality fabric which will last a few decades if not more, it's cool and coarse at the same time.
View attachment 69368

I could put my fingers on it for hours. It's delicate and elegant but also sturdy. Same material as the Swords album. Not sure what they call it.
Generally, I like the Attack records for their minimalist style but also high-quality appearance. Probably the influence of the Italian fashion industry during that time.

View attachment 69369

These two singles look like a pair of ties, one in light blue for the boy, and one in light pink for the girl. Just the essentials. I prefer the cover of "Future" to that of "Redondo" though, just because of that reason, as the photograph on the Redondo cover represents a completely different style, it is American, and lacks the European understatement of the label. Why they chose a pink label though, I can't say.

View attachment 69370

I thought, I could as well add some rustic style to the melange of styles of Redondo, and see what happens. The live version of "Light" is another treat. Both songs, Redondo and Light benefit from an individual listen, and seem to bloom under these exclusive circumstances, which makes us all happy in the long run, of course.
I never play my 7’s. They’re in a box and the odd one aside, don’t get a run out. I’m going to dedicate a day to playing the lot shortly. I usually do the 12’ from Suedehead to Satellite every couple of months but i must do the 7.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Do you know how many Moz single 12 inchers there are? I've never counted them, and surely do not have all 12"ers from Suedehead to Satellite. Do you? I think I have 5 or 6 myself, and in general I prefer them to the 7 inchers.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
r3.jpg


Listened to the Songs For Drella album again. Has been a while since I last listened to the full album, most likely the early 90s. I know the songs in and out, coz it had been one of the few constant companions of my late teens. One of the rare and special library finds on tape, that turn into the musical backdrop of your life, which is so important when you are growing up in a small town.
It has lost a bit of its charme for me over the decades though, probably because there is no longer an elemente of surprise, but nevertheless, it is galaxies better than most of the stuffe we listened to in the 80s and 90s. Maybe in the weeks to come I can discover a new facet of this album that has hitherto been hidden from me.
What I have here is a 1990 Europe & UK version on the Sire label, which is a pretty flimsy and light affair. Would've expected something heavier, at least 180g or so.

Big Drella & lil' Future:
r4.jpg
 
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View attachment 69468

Listened to the Songs For Drella album again. Has been a while since I last listened to the full album, most likely the early 90s. I know the songs in and out, coz it had been one of the few constant companions of my late teens. One of the rare and special library finds on tape, that turn into the musical backdrop of your life, which is so important when you are growing up in a small town.
It has lost a bit of its charme for me over the decades though, probably because there is no longer an elemente of surprise, but nevertheless, it is galaxies better than most of the stuffe we listened to in the 80s and 90s. Maybe in the weeks to come I can discover a new facet of this album that has hitherto been hidden from me.
What I have here is a 1990 Europe & UK version on the Sire label, which is a pretty flimsy and light affair. Would've expected something heavier, at least 180g or so.

Big Drella & lil' Future:
View attachment 69470

Yeah, that can happen.
Some things that ya listened to with such an exhilaratin' intrest,
can't bring that same zealin' feelin' to the fore no more.
Ya gotta figure it's only natural though.
Partly it's that at them young ages, ya ain't had as much weather
affect ya and everything is still new.
Then again, as ya make ya progression through life, that same
weather has caused new dimensions of adaptation, which in turn
effects ya perceptions.
Great thing about music though, if ya keep diggin' and listenin',
ya just might find some new ones to exhilarate ya again.
 
J

Janice

Guest
Do you know how many Moz single 12 inchers there are? I've never counted them, and surely do not have all 12"ers from Suedehead to Satellite. Do you? I think I have 5 or 6 myself, and in general I prefer them to the 7 inchers.
Yes. Yes I do. I have all the UK/IS/Canada and a few of Europe/EEC release. As I said, I have all the 7 releases UK/Europe but never play them.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Yes. Yes I do. I have all the UK/IS/Canada and a few of Europe/EEC release. As I said, I have all the 7 releases UK/Europe but never play them.
So, can you tell me the difference between the 12" Single and the 12" Maxi of, let's say, Suedehead? I have the 12" single here, and just wonder if it's also the LP version of the song on the Maxi.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Yeah, that can happen.
Some things that ya listened to with such an exhilaratin' intrest,
can't bring that same zealin' feelin' to the fore no more.
Ya gotta figure it's only natural though.
Partly it's that at them young ages, ya ain't had as much weather
affect ya and everything is still new.

Then again, as ya make ya progression through life, that same
weather has caused new dimensions of adaptation, which in turn
effects ya perceptions.
Great thing about music though, if ya keep diggin' and listenin',
ya just might find some new ones to exhilarate ya again.
Yeah, I see what ya mean. After a coppola years we are pretty much weather-beaten by life. Not easy though to find the right music for our weathered and whithered ears later on while diggin through it all, life, weather and music. Always feels like a special moment when ya can attach yaself exhilaratingly for a longer period of time.
 
J

Janice

Guest
Yes. The UK and Argentinian releases are 3:56. The rest are all come in at 3:54 (with one exception - 3.55)
So they’re all the same versions (album)
There are 2 US maxi catalogue releases but, with no difference in tracks or sleeve colour
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
q1.jpg


Lemme quickly sum up my interesting reactions to this new batch of records:

1.
Beethoven/Hummel Mandolin music - I must say that this old and trashy record is a treat. Hummel's piano on the B-Side is the icing on the cake though.
2.
The 12" Pregnant single is a fine acquisition, the title song galloping into your ears like a semi-feral horse. Sound-wise it does not come up to my high expectations, but Disappointed on the B-Side certainly has its sparkling moments.
3.
The Pixies - Dig for Fire. Nope. I thought, I'd give the Pixies another chance, but I simply cannot get warm with their music. It's mostly the vocals which are a downer.
4.
Songs for Drella
- Has been analysed with @The Wild Turkey in them posts above.
5.
Aquarian Dream - You're A Star: A fine disco tune, but should of been a bit longer on the 12". Despite being a 12" single, the sound is pretty lame, most likely bc it has been worn out over the years.
6.
Dixieland Festival - Kept for future convivial gatherings when I have to play the host.
7.
Morrissey - Future Hell/Christian Dior: nice high-quality packaging has preserved the record over the decades. Great to touch and listen to. Sound is still awesome.
8.
Morrissey - Redondo/Light: not as elegant as the above-mentioned 7" packaging of Future, but nevertheless a fine lil record.
9.
Prince - The Future: completely worn out record, at most "Fair" quality. I do not like many Prince songs, but this one is okay. A mass-produced article in and out. There is even a barcode on the label. Not much fun any longer. I'm not gonna keep it.
10.
Boxers - Morrissey: also a very worn out record. It crackles so noisily that it actually spoils the song throughout. Cheap packaging in a paper jacket. This is one of my Top Ten Moz songs, but listening to this old 7" is not much fun any longer.
11.
And last but not least, The Travelling Wilburys.
Surprise, surprise! The A-Side was pretty lame after all these years, and I had already accused myself for being in a bad mood with no patience for music today, but when I turned the record over, I was exhilarated, how much I liked the B-Side. The songs on the B-Side have much more character and have survived the decades nicely. I especially like the Bob Dyland and George Harrison tunes.
They should think about rereleasing the B-side as an EP with one new song by Bob and Jeff Lynne as an hommage to the dead band members.
 
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Yeah, I see what ya mean. After a coppola years we are pretty much weather-beaten by life. Not easy though to find the right music for our weathered and whithered ears later on while diggin through it all, life, weather and music. Always feels like a special moment when ya can attach yaself exhilaratingly for a longer period of time.

Come to think of it, two records that still do have a lastin' exhilaration:

R-857505-1398955836-9431.jpeg.jpg


81cfjug%2BXRL._SY355_.jpg
 
J

Janice

Guest
View attachment 69503

Lemme quickly sum up my interesting reactions to this new batch of records:

1.
Beethoven/Hummel Mandolin music - I must say that this old and trashy record is a treat. Hummel's piano on the B-Side is the icing on the cake though.
2.
The 12" Pregnant single is a fine acquisition, the title song galloping into your ears like a semi-feral horse. Sound-wise it does not come up to my high expectations, but Disappointed on the B-Side certainly has its sparkling moments.
3.
The Pixies - Dig for Fire. Nope. I thought, I'd give the Pixies another chance, but I simply cannot get warm with their music. It's mostly the vocals which are a downer.
4.
Songs for Drella
- Has been analysed with @The Wild Turkey in them posts above.
5.
Aquarian Dream - You're A Star: A fine disco tune, but should of been a bit longer on the 12". Despite being a 12" single, the sound is pretty lame, most likely bc it has been worn out over the years.
6.
Dixieland Festival - Kept for future convivial gatherings when I have to play the host.
7.
Morrissey - Future Hell/Christian Dior: nice high-quality packaging has preserved the record over the decades. Great to touch and listen to. Sound is still awesome.
8.
Morrissey - Redondo/Light: not as elegant as the above-mentioned 7" packaging of Future, but nevertheless a fine lil record.
9.
Prince - The Future: completely worn out record, at most "Fair" quality. I do not like many Prince songs, but this one is okay. A mass-produced article in and out. There is even a barcode on the label. Not much fun any longer. I'm not gonna keep it.
10.
Boxers - Morrissey: also a very worn out record. It crackles so noisily that it actually spoils the song throughout. Cheap packaging in a paper jacket. This is one of my Top Ten Moz songs, but listening to this old 7" is not much fun any longer.
11.
And last but not least, The Travelling Wilburys.
Surprise, surprise! The A-Side was pretty lame after all these years, and I had already accused myself for being in a bad mood with no patience for music today, but when I turned the record over, I was exhilarated, how much I liked the B-Side. The songs on the B-Side have much more character and have survived the decades nicely. I especially like the Bob Dyland and George Harrison tunes.
They should think about rereleasing the B-side as an EP with one new song by Bob and Jeff Lynne as an hommage to the dead band members.
The Boxers one. I don’t get the poor packaging you’re referring to.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Yes. The UK and Argentinian releases are 3:56. The rest are all come in at 3:54 (with one exception - 3.55)
So they’re all the same versions (album)
There are 2 US maxi catalogue releases but, with no difference in tracks or sleeve colour
Alright, so whereas everyone else is calling the 12" single 12" single, the US are calling their 12" singles Maxis.
I remember though, in the 80s, I used to buy lotsa "Maxi singles" - as they were called - here in Central Europe, and those were always altered album/radio versions, usually extended mixes with a longer instrumental section.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
The Boxers one. I don’t get the poor packaging you’re referring to.
s0.jpg


I agree that the Boxers jacket is not completely made of thin paper (this was actually the Prince single), but when you compare it to the 7" Future single, you can see that it is much thinner and thus can easily be bent out of shape, which this one did. There is also some visible ringwear on the front cover. I guess that the quality of the jacket also affects the record's condition after some years of storage.

s1.jpg


Another thing I like about the Future jacket is that the upper folded edge has been glued inside the sleeve and not outside, like it is the case with Boxers. This contributes to the overall impression of a handmade premium quality article.
 
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born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Some more gems and curiosities from my mum's basement.

w0.jpg


and a copolla Morrissey 7 inchers...
w1.jpg


I remember that as a kid I listened to the Alexandra record a lot. Especially liked My friend the tree is dead. How very unusual and daring to sing about such a topic in those days. Probably one of the saddest songs ever written.
The John Fogerty album is very strong musically and especially vocally. Have always liked that about it.
Some of the albums I can hardly remember coz they were so extremely boring, like Christopher Cross, John Lennon and the Bee Gees. Let's see if tastes have changed in the meantime.
Not sure when I am gonna wash em, most likely not today, coz I have just returned, and I am still suffering from an injury at my right hand coz a heavy fire door crushed my middle finger at work on Friday, had to go to my doc, and he had to cut it open to release the blood, also got a tetanus injection and now I am pretty knackered. Good news: was also covid tested while waiting for my finger to exsanguinate and i am negative for a change.
 
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born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
My temporary physical disability didn't stop me from takin a closer look at some of the horribly dusty and grime-stained records that I had picked up recently. The hand is still a bit shaky though, when tryin to hold up a camera... I am surprised how much my finger looks like a finger again, one of the massive blood blisters has almost disappeared, reduced to a shadow of its former self, the second one under the nail is still there, as bulbous and throbbing as before. I always say that I cannot avoid gettin sick or injured, that's part of life, but most of the times I am sweating it out quickly.
x0.jpg


Here are three Moz Attack singles and one Parlophone one. As I said before, the Attack records are among the finest and most tasteful Moz releases, musically as well as with regard to their appearance. Imho. Due to their bullet-resistant outer sleeves, the records are still in fine shape. These are quality articles, no doubt about that. The avocado-colored LMKU label is a pleasure to look at. Great songs altogether.

Unfortunately, I cannot say the same about the Parlophone single.
x3.jpg


Looks weird with his head cut off, and his face glued into this film still, from what movie? Great song, though.

x2.jpg
#

Despite being a little bit frayed, Jesus is still in super condition. Needs a wash though.

x1.jpg


Yep. No complaints. The label is, if I am not wrong, identical to the one on the 12" Irish Blood single.
Résumé: With such handsome vinyl artifacts in jim-dandy condition, I don't need no promo copies.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
Gonna clean some of the records from my mum's basement today to fix em up for being bartered at the second hand vinyl shop next week.

So, for these I usually don't use my hard-to-get bidest double-distilled water, but the normal distilled water from the gas station, which will do just as well.

Swapping them for something else is the only way to avoid a losin' bargain, but only if I find something of musical value there. Which will be the hardest part. I was lucky with a horribly filthy first press Gong album, the "Flying teapot", once, which I got for two uninteresting Ray Charles reissues. But flipping through their crates usually leaves me utterly depressed, not just because of all the dirt sticking to my hands afterwards but also for seeing the insipidness and banality of the past materialized and thus preserved in countless vinyl records. And don't get me wrong, 98% of these records are of no musical or material value at all. Having lost their high-gloss shine and charm of novelty over the years, all that remains is distilled vapidity in its pure form. It's like visiting a grave yard and being attacked by moaning zombies, which should actually be pulverized immediately.
Unfortunately, the owner nevertheless tries to sell like for example the Best of Roy Black Christmas Songs for 12€. Makes you wonder if this store is just a money laundering business. There is also no historical value attached to these records, unless you want to study the marketing and mass-production of 20th century insipidness in music, which is probably not a very rewarding thing to do.

Anyways, anybody interested in gettin into the curating business should visit such a shop and write some reviews of these records on offer. You'll pass your master craftsman exam only if somebody is actually buying one of those curated articles.

Okay, I feel better now, after venting my spleen, or, after having puked it all off from my chest. It had to be done. :p
 

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