Michael Stipe Mentions Morrissey in acast.com interview

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Anonymous

Guest
Rem musically sounded more like the smiths in there early period. Political literate guitar jangle bands with some alt punk influences and feminine earnest singers. Both taking influence in folk music. Marr talking about English folk music was a neat thing to read. The harmonies in rem really set the music apart though. It's something the smiths or morrissey for that matter never did. Reckoning sounds the most like the smiths Imo. Apparently marr and buck both used to joke a bit about being similar. It should be noted though that I think rem came first and so it would be hard for them to imitate the smiths on albums like reckoning or song like harbor coat
 

Dave2006

Active Member
The longevity of the R.E.M. Thread here on Solo would suggest that there are a lot of fans of both. Both great bands, great front men and great artists.

Dave
 

g23

Always crashing in the same car
I can't agree with that. REM had a few good songs in the beginning, but compare them to the Smiths or Morrissey as a solo artist? No way. Stipe has never been sexually ambiguous, either.
Michael Stipe didn't come out of the closet until 2008. I'd say that left a little room for ambiguity and speculation. Morrissey likely won't come out of the closet until he's dead and other people spill the beans.
I mean, it's none of our business, and changes nothing- but still.
 

gordyboy9

GAME OF DEATH.
one of the funniest bits in autobiography about m and stipe walking on a lovely summers day through the park before rem play a concert and mozz quips that before going onstage how he NEVER EVEN BRUSHED HIS TEETH,no wonder mozz never kissed him.
 

SeniorLife

Those who don't know, don't know, they don't know.
one of the funniest bits in autobiography about m and stipe walking on a lovely summers day through the park before rem play a concert and mozz quips that before going onstage how he NEVER EVEN BRUSHED HIS TEETH,no wonder mozz never kissed him.
I literally was just going to post that. I loved that bit from Auto. I think Moz also mentioned in the same paragraph how Stipe literally walked on stage from the back door minutes before the gig started in the same clothes he had worn all day. Love that kind of insight.
 

Flibberty

Well-Known Member
Don't know for sure but didn't Moz once said Found, Found, Found is about Michael Stipe?
Found someone in this murkiness. (Someone, at the time maybe the only one, in the musicindustry he liked?)

No, according to Mozipedia this is incorrect.

In one interview Morrissey talked about that song, and then answered a completely unrelated question about Michael Stipe. People mistakenly linked the two.
 

butley

Well-Known Member
I liked R.E.M. when they were really big to be honest. Stipe does try a bit too hard to be pale and interesting. Morrissey does it naturally with such flair.
 

SuedeMoz

Well-Known Member
I remember around the time of Kill Uncle there was a much publicized friendship between the two. Seemed short lived (publically at least) and never mentioned later.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Compare the beginnings of "Lifeguard On Duty" and "Near Wild Heaven". There you have the musical similarities between Morrissey and R.E.M.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I remember around the time of Kill Uncle there was a much publicized friendship between the two. Seemed short lived (publically at least) and never mentioned later.

Stipe took Moz to diner in the early 2000s (I think) with Fran Healy and Courtney Love. They may not be friends anymore but I imagine they are happy when they see each other by chance. They just have nice things to say about each other.
 

valvano

Active Member
Attending college in the North Carolina in the mid to late 1980s, REM was somewhat of a local Southern college band that suddenly hit the big time, especially considering that they recorded their first albums in Winston Salem NC. One of the best concerts I ever attended was REM with 10,000 Maniacs opening at Duke's Cameron in Durham, NC in 1987 (maybe 1988).

Once they left IRS and went commercial it was over.

I witnessed some great shows in the late 80s while in college, but unfortunately never got to see the Smiths. Closest they ever played to me was in DC and I was still in high school.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Attending college in the North Carolina in the mid to late 1980s, REM was somewhat of a local Southern college band that suddenly hit the big time, especially considering that they recorded their first albums in Winston Salem NC. One of the best concerts I ever attended was REM with 10,000 Maniacs opening at Duke's Cameron in Durham, NC in 1987 (maybe 1988).

Once they left IRS and went commercial it was over.

I witnessed some great shows in the late 80s while in college, but unfortunately never got to see the Smiths. Closest they ever played to me was in DC and I was still in high school.

Agree that they changed a lot after leaving IRS but I think they still put out great songs here and there that reminded me of there older stuff. Losing my religion is still a fantastic song along with man on the moon poet imitation of life the great beyond bad day etc. I myself dream about the tour they did with the replacements opening. That would have been a thing to see. I also really enjoyed as an album the song hollow man in it, blanking on the title, as it kinda as a whole reminded me of the early period. Didn't care much for the last album
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I liked R.E.M. when they were really big to be honest. Stipe does try a bit too hard to be pale and interesting. Morrissey does it naturally with such flair.

Yeah, what's up with that German philosopher/Russian novelist look he is "rocking" these days? I wouldn't kiss that smelly gob if my life depended on it.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Agree that they changed a lot after leaving IRS but I think they still put out great songs here and there that reminded me of there older stuff. Losing my religion is still a fantastic song along with man on the moon poet imitation of life the great beyond bad day etc. I myself dream about the tour they did with the replacements opening. That would have been a thing to see. I also really enjoyed as an album the song hollow man in it, blanking on the title, as it kinda as a whole reminded me of the early period. Didn't care much for the last album
Whenever I hear Losing my religion I plug my ears or turn off the radio. Can't stand the song.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
If the Smiths had stayed together, they probably would have had a career like REM's.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Whenever I hear Losing my religion I plug my ears or turn off the radio. Can't stand the song.

I love the lyrics and the title being a southern saying about being at your wits end according to stipe over a person and pining for said person. Following them and from what I take from the lyrics for trying to change yourself to be more like them or more worth while in there and possibly you own eyes. Lines like I thought that I head you laughing and the lengths that I will go to really make me feel the narrators feelings of inadequacy and yearning as they take form in the desire for a new Person unlike themselves and more like who they wish to be. Anyway reminds me of smiths songs like half a person etc to bring it back to the thread topic. Buck said this was the most typical rem sounding song on the record which at that point means more like the eighties days and the IRS years which is probably why I enjoy it so much
 

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