Everything connects to The Beatles

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Anonymous

Guest
Even our Morrissey connects to The Beatles. Morrissey was photographed last year wearing a John Lennon badge. A Yoko Ono one as well. But I'd bet my legs that there are other connections there somewhere.

Just about to click 'Post Thread' when I thought of another connection between Morrissey and The Beatles. Morrissey's song, Neal Cassady Drops Dead, mentions Allen Ginsberg as well as Neal Cassady. There's a pretty big (and interesting) connection between The Beat Generation, Allen Ginsberg, Howl and The Beatles. https://www.beatdom.com/the-beats-and-the-beatles-two-sides-of-the-same-coin/

Anyway, I've just read a review of Stephen Malkmus' new album, Traditional Techniques. And, like everything, it connects to The Beatles.

Here's the informative paragraph:

"The title of Traditional Techniques references German philosopher and cultural critic Theodor Adorno’s 1965 screed against the Beatles: “What can be urged against the Beatles is simply that what these people have to offer is something that is retarded in terms of its own objective content…the means of expression that are employed and preserved here are in reality no more than traditional techniques in a degraded form.” With this album, Malkmus opposes such elitism by once again showing how the language and history of popular music can serve as an effective channel for even his peculiar sentiments and worldview. That he’s done so for the first time in a largely slow, acoustic vein proves that he can change our understanding of just what this kind of music might accomplish beyond its “traditional” forms and functions."

Slant gave the album 4 stars.



Everything connects to The Beatles.
 

Aubrey McFate

Lonely in Barcelona
I didn't know Morrissey had worn John Lennon and Yoko Ono badges. That's interesting. I love John and Yoko almost to excess. From what I recall, Morrissey was always stridently averse to 60s psychedelica. Certainly he was never any admirer of the Doors. There's an old interview with Spanish television where he lays into the Doors and says, dismissively, "I don't think they ever had any hit singles," and Johnny Marr, seated beside him, rolls his eyes. I imagine the psychedelic baroque of Sgt. Pepper would've been far too Hindu-garish and colorful for Morrissey's tastes, and his inclinations would be justified there. The monochromatic gloom of the Smiths' covers were a good tonic to that sort of thing.

Maybe he'll come around on Lennon like he did with the Rolling Stones. I could definitely see him preferring Yoko to John, and I think the period where Yoko's influence was heaviest on John would be Morrissey's favorite, were he to have one: the stripped-down and confrontational era of Plastic Ono Band and Imagine. I could see him having a cup of tea and petting the cat while listening to "Working Class Hero" or "Crippled Inside."
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I didn't know Morrissey had worn John Lennon and Yoko Ono badges. That's interesting. I love John and Yoko almost to excess. From what I recall, Morrissey was always stridently averse to 60s psychedelica. Certainly he was never any admirer of the Doors. There's an old interview with Spanish television where he lays into the Doors and says, dismissively, "I don't think they ever had any hit singles," and Johnny Marr, seated beside him, rolls his eyes. I imagine the psychedelic baroque of Sgt. Pepper would've been far too Hindu-garish and colorful for Morrissey's tastes, and his inclinations would be justified there. The monochromatic gloom of the Smiths' covers were a good tonic to that sort of thing.

Maybe he'll come around on Lennon like he did with the Rolling Stones. I could definitely see him preferring Yoko to John, and I think the period where Yoko's influence was heaviest on John would be Morrissey's favorite, were he to have one: the stripped-down and confrontational era of Plastic Ono Band and Imagine. I could see him having a cup of tea and petting the cat while listening to "Working Class Hero" or "Crippled Inside."
If you listen to Morrissey's All The Young People Must Fall In Love, you can clearly hear Give Peace A Chance:


 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><>
I didn't know Morrissey had worn John Lennon and Yoko Ono badges. That's interesting. I love John and Yoko almost to excess. From what I recall, Morrissey was always stridently averse to 60s psychedelica. Certainly he was never any admirer of the Doors. There's an old interview with Spanish television where he lays into the Doors and says, dismissively, "I don't think they ever had any hit singles," and Johnny Marr, seated beside him, rolls his eyes. I imagine the psychedelic baroque of Sgt. Pepper would've been far too Hindu-garish and colorful for Morrissey's tastes, and his inclinations would be justified there. The monochromatic gloom of the Smiths' covers were a good tonic to that sort of thing.

Maybe he'll come around on Lennon like he did with the Rolling Stones. I could definitely see him preferring Yoko to John, and I think the period where Yoko's influence was heaviest on John would be Morrissey's favorite, were he to have one: the stripped-down and confrontational era of Plastic Ono Band and Imagine. I could see him having a cup of tea and petting the cat while listening to "Working Class Hero" or "Crippled Inside."
“Before every show you play a tape with your favourite songs.
- Yes. And it is something I love to do. And on that tape you heard yesterday, there was even some psychedelic music... British psychedelic music.

Yes, I noticed.
- Fascinating, isn't it? Although it was only one song. Traffic's "Hole in My Shoe". I discovered pop music when I was very, very small. In other terms, a long time ago. During the whole of the 60's and 70's I was completely possessed by pop music. And yes, I loved a lot of soul music, even some reggae and I loved cheap British pop and I still do. But I do not have a narrow, eccentric taste in music. I love rockabilly too. And Nina Simone's voice and Francoise Hardy's "You Just Have to Say The Word". And I love Cajun.”




And he once dedicated “Life is a pigsty’ to Syd Barrett. Don’t know if he listens to his records, but I’m sure he realizes Syd’s influence on pop music ever after.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I didn't know Morrissey had worn John Lennon and Yoko Ono badges. That's interesting. I love John and Yoko almost to excess. From what I recall, Morrissey was always stridently averse to 60s psychedelica. Certainly he was never any admirer of the Doors. There's an old interview with Spanish television where he lays into the Doors and says, dismissively, "I don't think they ever had any hit singles," and Johnny Marr, seated beside him, rolls his eyes. I imagine the psychedelic baroque of Sgt. Pepper would've been far too Hindu-garish and colorful for Morrissey's tastes, and his inclinations would be justified there. The monochromatic gloom of the Smiths' covers were a good tonic to that sort of thing.

Maybe he'll come around on Lennon like he did with the Rolling Stones. I could definitely see him preferring Yoko to John, and I think the period where Yoko's influence was heaviest on John would be Morrissey's favorite, were he to have one: the stripped-down and confrontational era of Plastic Ono Band and Imagine. I could see him having a cup of tea and petting the cat while listening to "Working Class Hero" or "Crippled Inside."
Here's the thread with pics of Morrissey wearing the Lennon & Ono badges: https://www.morrissey-solo.com/thre...mone-tribute-in-hollywood-aug-26-2018.142852/
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
“Before every show you play a tape with your favourite songs.
- Yes. And it is something I love to do. And on that tape you heard yesterday, there was even some psychedelic music... British psychedelic music.

Yes, I noticed.
- Fascinating, isn't it? Although it was only one song. Traffic's "Hole in My Shoe". I discovered pop music when I was very, very small. In other terms, a long time ago. During the whole of the 60's and 70's I was completely possessed by pop music. And yes, I loved a lot of soul music, even some reggae and I loved cheap British pop and I still do. But I do not have a narrow, eccentric taste in music. I love rockabilly too. And Nina Simone's voice and Francoise Hardy's "You Just Have to Say The Word". And I love Cajun.”




And he once dedicated “Life is a pigsty’ to Syd Barrett. Don’t know if he listens to his records, but I’m sure he realizes Syd’s influence on pop music ever after.
Syd Barrett and The Beatles: https://www.neptunepinkfloyd.co.uk/syd-barrett-and-the-beatles-1966-1969-by-john-j-olivar

Traffic and The Beatles:

The soundtrack also included songs recorded by Steve Winwood's previous band The Spencer Davis Group. Traffic were to have appeared in The Beatles "Magical Mystery Tour" film performing 'Here We Go Round The Mulberry Bush', but this footage was cut from the final version.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
“Before every show you play a tape with your favourite songs.
- Yes. And it is something I love to do. And on that tape you heard yesterday, there was even some psychedelic music... British psychedelic music.

Yes, I noticed.
- Fascinating, isn't it? Although it was only one song. Traffic's "Hole in My Shoe". I discovered pop music when I was very, very small. In other terms, a long time ago. During the whole of the 60's and 70's I was completely possessed by pop music. And yes, I loved a lot of soul music, even some reggae and I loved cheap British pop and I still do. But I do not have a narrow, eccentric taste in music. I love rockabilly too. And Nina Simone's voice and Francoise Hardy's "You Just Have to Say The Word". And I love Cajun.”




And he once dedicated “Life is a pigsty’ to Syd Barrett. Don’t know if he listens to his records, but I’m sure he realizes Syd’s influence on pop music ever after.
Francoise Hardy and The Beatles:

"At night they were visited at their hotel by popular French singer Françoise Hardy, before The Beatles went to the Castel nightclub on 15 Rue Princesse, where they partied until the early hours."

 

Ketamine Sun

<><><><><><><><>
Francoise Hardy and The Beatles:

"At night they were visited at their hotel by popular French singer Françoise Hardy, before The Beatles went to the Castel nightclub on 15 Rue Princesse, where they partied until the early hours."

Hardy was out of their league.
 

Aubrey McFate

Lonely in Barcelona
Brigitte Bardot. John Lennon was infatuated with BB, according to Cynthia Lennon:
John's perfect image of a woman was Brigitte Bardot. I found myself fast becoming molded into her style of dress and haircut. I had only recently gone through my change from secretary-bird to bohemian when I met John, but under his influence another metamorphosis was taking place and this time the emphasis was on oomph! Long blonde hair, tight black sweaters, tight short skirts, high-heeled pointed shoes, and to add the final touch, black fishnet stockings and suspenders.
Paul McCartney is a vegetarian, and in a story that we should sincerely hope is untrue (and possibly a figment of what might be the beginnings of a McCartneyan senility), he claims the teenaged Beatles invoked the holy name of Bardot in a group masturbation session. Bardot (peace be upon her) is a vegetarian and animal rights advocate. Morrissey of course is the same, and there are certain convergences in their political views.

 
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AztecCamera

Well-Known Member
I reckon if you're talkin' bout the California Son. Everything connects to the Go's-Go's cunt tit tossey inn n n nnn n nnnn n it.
 
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