____ Makes The Smiths Different From Morrissey Solo

Z

zom

Guest
To you what is the biggest difference if any between Smiths/Solo work from Morrissey? Any prefrence?

zom...
 
A

Auntie T.

Guest
> To you what is the biggest difference if any between Smiths/Solo work from
> Morrissey? Any prefrence?

The difference is the musical composition and sonic texture of Johnny Marr...

I love the Smiths and Moz's solo work as well!

> zom...
 
D

david

Guest
> To you what is the biggest difference if any between Smiths/Solo work from
> Morrissey? Any prefrence?

> zom...

The Smiths and Vini reilly-era Morrissey solo were defined by superb musicians. Since reilly left, Morrissey's musicians haven't been anywhere near as good.
 
S

Strange Dust

Guest
Morrissey dominates the solo work so that anything that isn't him is somehow of secondary importance. With Marr, Morrissey had an equal who's input Morrissey had to respect as as valuable as his own. This forces the solo work to be driven wholly by Morrissey's lyrics and voice - it's almost impossible to listen to it without focusing entirely on the voice. The failure of Southpaw for us is that insted of listening to it as a musical creation we are sidetracked by Morrissey repeating 'Dagenham Dave' over and over and miss the broader musica sweep of the thing.

> To you what is the biggest difference if any between Smiths/Solo work from
> Morrissey? Any prefrence?

> zom...
 
T

The Original J.T. Ripper

Guest
> Morrissey dominates the solo work so that anything that isn't him is
> somehow of secondary importance. With Marr, Morrissey had an equal who's
> input Morrissey had to respect as as valuable as his own. This forces the
> solo work to be driven wholly by Morrissey's lyrics and voice - it's
> almost impossible to listen to it without focusing entirely on the voice.
> The failure of Southpaw for us is that insted of listening to it as a
> musical creation we are sidetracked by Morrissey repeating 'Dagenham Dave'
> over and over and miss the broader musica sweep of the thing.

Do you feel this to be true with regards to Vauxhall as well? I agree with your general comments, but on Vauxhall Morrissey's voice really does become almost an additional instrument alongside the rest. There is no dominance of vocals in a track such as "Lifeguard Sleeping...", on which Boz's clarinet is perhaps most prominent.

Or take the elegaic "Now My Heart Is Full" -- the voice is prominent, but not overpowering, with a subtly and softness that blends instead of hammers. The jangling and ringing guitars take the forefront on "Used To Be a Sweet Boy," while on the majority of the remaining tracks his vocals are hushed and crooning, meshing perfectly with the guitars and bass.

Heck, even going back as early as Viva Hate we get a track like "late night maudlin st.", which is about as hushed as one can get.

Contrasting those with something like Frankly Mr. Shankly -- sure Marr's guitar is there providing a bounce, but Moz's vocals and intonation are the major aspects of that track.

Still, I suppose i'm just devil-advocating. Marr's melodies were certainly more distinct and airy than Alain's or Boz's, and it's true that Marr was more of an equal. I think the results of Moz's subjugating of his guitarists post-Smiths has been an uneven track record --- the best of Moz's solo work bests anything by the Smiths, but on the other hand the very worst stuff Moz has ever done ALSO belongs to his solo output. Well, plus the Smiths' debut ;-)

J.T.
 
S

Strange Dust

Guest
When I say Morrissey's voice dominates I mean our relationship with it. Most fans hang on Morrissey's every word and miss the music - they dont give it the respect it deserves. I personally like Southpaw, but initailly I disliked it becasue I wanted to hear Morrissey - the fact that it opens with a 20min drum solo is not what I wanted as a Morrissey fan. Vauxhall provides the fan with what they want and expect from Morrissey, the quality of the music can thus be taken for granted and we give Morrissey all the plaudits.
With the Smiths I'm as much draw to the music as I am to the voice not becasue it's necessarily better than Alain's or Boz's stuff, but because I insinctively trust and respect Marr's contribution. This is just a problem of perception, but it does vastly influence my relationship with the music.

> Do you feel this to be true with regards to Vauxhall as well? I agree with
> your general comments, but on Vauxhall Morrissey's voice really does
> become almost an additional instrument alongside the rest. There is no
> dominance of vocals in a track such as "Lifeguard Sleeping...",
> on which Boz's clarinet is perhaps most prominent.

> Or take the elegaic "Now My Heart Is Full" -- the voice is
> prominent, but not overpowering, with a subtly and softness that blends
> instead of hammers. The jangling and ringing guitars take the forefront on
> "Used To Be a Sweet Boy," while on the majority of the remaining
> tracks his vocals are hushed and crooning, meshing perfectly with the
> guitars and bass.

> Heck, even going back as early as Viva Hate we get a track like "late
> night maudlin st.", which is about as hushed as one can get.

> Contrasting those with something like Frankly Mr. Shankly -- sure Marr's
> guitar is there providing a bounce, but Moz's vocals and intonation are
> the major aspects of that track.

> Still, I suppose i'm just devil-advocating. Marr's melodies were certainly
> more distinct and airy than Alain's or Boz's, and it's true that Marr was
> more of an equal. I think the results of Moz's subjugating of his
> guitarists post-Smiths has been an uneven track record --- the best of
> Moz's solo work bests anything by the Smiths, but on the other hand the
> very worst stuff Moz has ever done ALSO belongs to his solo output. Well,
> plus the Smiths' debut ;-)

> J.T.
 
Top Bottom